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  Principle Name: Connect to personally relevant contexts            
  Created by: Linn, Davis, Bell
  Last change by Tamar Ronen Fuhrmann at 2007-12-13 05:04:27
  
Images of connected features:
 
Zooming-in: From the big picture to the details
 
Contextualized definitions in “Hanging with Friends - Velocity Style!
 
Scaffolding templates for writing a Story
 
Authentic contexts in the Jasper project
 
Hands-on examples of molecular visualization content

Connections 
Meta-Principles connections:
  • Make Contents Accessible
  • Features connections:
  • Personalized problem description in Galactic Exchange
  • Thermal Equilibrium activity
  • Animation Creation Tool
  • Zooming-in: From the big picture to the details
  • Contextualized definitions in “Hanging with Friends - Velocity Style!
  • Scaffolding templates for writing a Story
  • Authentic contexts in the Jasper project
  • Student pair-teaching of theoretical topics in assessment in online forums
  • Using the nature of smell to provide evidence of particles in IQWST
  • Hands-on examples of molecular visualization content


  • Description:
    This principle calls for designing instruction that encourages learners to investigate personally relevant problems and revisit their science ideas regularly.
    Too often students find academic science lacking personal relevance. This sense of irrelevance leads to lack of personal interest and low engagement levels (Duschl, Schweingruber, & Shouse, 2007). Personally-relevant problems drawn from students’ everyday lives, such as determining how to keep a drink cold or how to minimize the potential radiation danger associated with cellular phone use can make science accessible and authentic. Such problems can elicit intuitive ideas to fuel inquiry (Fortus, Dershimer, Krajcik, Marx, & Mamlok-Naaman, 2004; Linn & Hsi, 2000; Songer & Linn, 1991) because students have had prior experiences related to the problem scenarios. Linn, Davis, and Bell (2004) show that eliciting the broad range of student ideas about science and supporting students to negotiate and explore these ideas enables them to build more coherent, durable scientific knowledge.
    To make science accessible, instructional designers have to design the scientific content they offer students rather than necessarily choosing the most sophisticated ideas or the most attractive illustration. Designers have the responsibility of selecting the scope of knowledge integration, the examples, the sequence of topics, and the context of generalization.
    Theoretical background: 

    Tips (Challenges, Limitations, Tradeoffs, Pitfalls):
    Implementing this principle involves seeking examples that resonate with student experiences and interests. These are individual, cultural and contextual, and might be difficult to predict.
    References (Off-line):
    Linn, M. C., Davis, E. A., & Bell, P. (2004). Internet environments for science education. Mahwah, NJ:
    Erlbaum.
    Kali, Y., Fortus, D., & Ronen-Fuhrmann, T. (in press). Synthesizing TELS and CCMS design knowledge. In Y. Kali, M. C. Linn & J. E. Roseman (Eds.), Designing Coherent Science Education. NY: Teachers College Press.
    References (Online):
    http://www.internetscienceeducation.org/chapter13.html
    Summary of changes (wiki):
    1.Changed name of principle
    History